health care  
 
All about pulmonary alveolar proteinosis causes of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis symptoms of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis treatment for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

How is pulmonary alveolar proteinosis diagnosed?

Physical examination may reveal clubbing of the fingers or a bluish coloration of the skin as a result of decreased oxygen. A chest X-ray may show dense shadows similar to pulmonary edema. An arterial blood gases reveals low oxygen levels in the blood. Pulmonary function tests may show restrictive lung disease and abnormal diffusion. High-resolution CT scan of the chest may show dense bilateral infiltrates in the lungs Bronchoscopy with lavage (washing the lungs with saline) may show a milky fluid.

 

More information on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

What is pulmonary alveolar proteinosis? - Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disorder in which the tiny air sacs of the lungs fill up with a secreted material known as surfactant.
What causes pulmonary alveolar proteinosis? - The cause of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is unknown. It appears to result from infection, immune deficiency, or from exposure to silica.
What're the symptoms of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis? - Symptoms of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis include mild shortness of breath associated with a nonproductive or minimally productive cough, weight loss.
How is pulmonary alveolar proteinosis diagnosed? - Pulmonary function tests may show restrictive lung disease and abnormal diffusion.
What's the treatment for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis? - The only treatment for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is removal of the excessive surfactant material from the alveoli.
Respiratory & lung diseases Mainpage

Topics in respiratory and lung diseases

Lung diseases
Occupational lung diseases
Asthma
Respiratory infections
Respiration disorders
Broncheal diseases
Pleural diseases
Lung transplant
 

Featured articles on respiratory and lung diseases

COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
Emphysema
Asbestosis
Lung cancer
Mesothelioma
Silicosis
Pulmonary hypertension
Cystic fibrosis
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
Influenza
Bronchitis
Pneumonia

All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005