health care  
 
All about occupational asthma causes of occupational asthma symptoms of occupational asthma diagnosis of occupational asthma treatment for occupational asthma prevention of occupational asthma

What is occupational asthma?

Occupational asthma is a form of lung disease in which the breathing passages shrink, swell, or become inflamed or

congested as a result of exposure to irritants in the workplace. Occupational asthma is a lung disorder characterized by attacks of breathing difficulty, wheezing, prolonged exhalation, and cough, which is caused by various agents found in the work place. These symptoms are usually due to spasms of the muscles lining the airways, which cause them to narrow excessively.

Occupational asthma is defined as variable air flow limitation caused by a specific agent in the workplace. Hundreds of different types of jobs involve exposure to substances that could trigger occupational asthma, but only a small fraction of people who do such work develop this disorder. Occupational asthma is most apt to affect workers who have personal or family histories of allergies or asthma, or who are often required to handle or breathe dust or fumes created by especially irritating material. Occupational asthma is usually reversible, but permanent lung damage can occur if exposure continues to the substance that causes the disease. In highly sensitive persons, even very low levels of exposure may provoke an episode.

More information on occupational asthma

What is occupational asthma? - Occupational asthma is a form of lung disease in which the breathing passages shrink, swell, or become inflamed or congested as a result of exposure to irritants in the workplace.
What causes occupational asthma? - There are many agents in the workplace that can cause occupational asthma. More than 240 causes of occupational asthma have been identified.
What're the symptoms of occupational asthma? - Symptoms and signs of occupational asthma include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness and shortness of breath.
How is occupational asthma diagnosed? - The history reveals a pattern of worsening symptoms of occupational asthma associated with exposure to a specific agent or workplace environment.
What's the treatment for occupational asthma? - The objective of treatment for occupational asthma is to limit exposure to the allergen and improve symptoms with bronchodilator therapy.
How to prevent occupational asthma? - Reduction in exposure to the occupational trigger is the most important step to prevent occupational asthma.
Respiratory & lung diseases Mainpage

Topics in respiratory and lung diseases

Lung diseases
Occupational lung diseases
Asthma
Respiratory infections
Respiration disorders
Broncheal diseases
Pleural diseases
Lung transplant
 

Featured articles on respiratory and lung diseases

COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
Emphysema
Asbestosis
Lung cancer
Mesothelioma
Silicosis
Pulmonary hypertension
Cystic fibrosis
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
Influenza
Bronchitis
Pneumonia


All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005